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Math Calendar

Upcoming Events

April 16, 2024 (Tuesday), 2:35 pm

Dissertation Defense

Thesis Defense – Location- 311 Furman

Julio Caceres- Vanderbilt University

April 17, 2024 (Wednesday), 12:16 pm

Topology & Group Theory Seminar

Quasiflats and quasi-isometric rigidity in hierarchically hyperbolic spaces- Location- SC 1432

Jason Behrstock – CUNY

Hierarchically hyperbolic spaces provide a uniform framework for working with many important examples, including mapping class groups, right angled Artin groups, Teichmuller space, and others. In this talk, I’ll provide an introduction to studying groups and spaces from this point of view. This discussion will center around work in which we classify quasiflats in these spaces, thereby resolving a number of well-known questions and conjectures. In particular, I will discuss how this study of quasiflats can be used to prove quasi-isometric rigidity for certain families of groups. This is joint work with Mark Hagen and Alessandro Sisto.

April 18, 2024 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Colloquium

On aqua planets – Location- SC 5211

Gieri Simonett- Vanderbilt

I will consider the motion of a viscous, incompressible fluid on a surface (or, more generally, on a Riemannian manifold). In this context, one might think of an aqua planet. The fluid motion is described by the surface Navier-Stokes equations. What are these equations, and how does the fluid evolve? Interestingly, there is an intriguing connection between the long-time behavior of solutions and the existence of Killing vector fields. Numerical simulations will also be shown to underscore theoretical predictions.

April 18, 2024 (Thursday), 4:10 pm

Colloquium

Do stars exist? – Location: SC 5211

Marcelo Disconzi – Vanderbilt University

Astronomy is arguably the oldest scientific discipline. Precise measurements of the motion of celestial bodies date back to the ancient Babylonians, Chinese, and indigenous peoples outside Eurasia. Yet, the basic objects of study in Astronomy, namely, stars, are not known to exist. By this, I mean that the standard model for describing the dynamics of a star, the Einstein-Euler system with a physical vacuum boundary, is not known to admit existence and uniqueness of solutions. As I’ll explain, this is due to a fundamental difficulty in understanding the mathematics of the fluid-vacuum interface which separates the body of the star from vacuum. This interface displays a singular behavior which is not amenable to current analytic-geometric techniques. In this talk, I’ll present recent progress in this problem which establishes, in the affirmative, existence and uniqueness of solutions to the system in some particular cases. The talk is based on joint works with Ifrim-Tataru and Speck.

April 19, 2024 (Friday), 1:25 pm

Geometry and Topology Seminar

Geometry and Topology – Title- TBA- Location: SC 1312

Bar Roytman – University of Michigan

Abstract – TBA

May 13, 2024 (Monday), 9:00 am

2024 Shanks International Conference on L-functions and Automorphic Form- May 13th – May 16th, 2024

May 14, 2024 (Tuesday), 8:00 am

2024 Shanks International Conference on L-functions and Automorphic Form- May 13th – May 16th, 2024

May 15, 2024 (Wednesday), 8:00 am

2024 Shanks International Conference on L-functions and Automorphic Form- May 13th – May 16th, 2024

May 16, 2024 (Thursday), 8:00 am

2024 Shanks International Conference on L-functions and Automorphic Form- May 13th – May 16th, 2024