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Theory of the Nudnik: The Future of Consumer Activism and What We Can Do to Stop It

May. 26, 2020—Yonathan A. Arbel & Roy Shapira | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 929 (2020) | How do consumers hold sellers accountable and enforce market norms? This Article contributes to our understanding of consumer markets in three ways. First, the Article identifies the role of a small subset of consumers—the titular “nudniks”—as engines of market discipline. Nudniks...

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Federalism and the Military Power of the United States

May. 26, 2020—Robert Leider | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 989 (2020) | This Article examines the original meaning of the constitutional provisions governing the raising and organization of military forces. It argues that the Framers carefully divided the military between the federal and state governments. This division provided structural checks against the misuse of military power and...

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Zombie Energy Laws

May. 26, 2020—Joshua C. Macey | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1077 (2020) | This Article traces the development of three legal rules—cost recovery for vertically integrated utilities, the requirement that regulators assess the financial viability of energy projects before issuing a certificate of public convenience and necessity, and the filed rate doctrine—that emerged out of the view...

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The Liberal Case Against the Modern Class Action

May. 26, 2020—Martin H. Redish | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1127 (2020) | Those who classify themselves as liberal generally favor widespread use of class actions as a means of policing corporate misbehavior and protecting the individual worker or consumer against capitalist excesses. In this Essay, however, I take the counterintuitive position that while class action practice...

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Why Class Actions Are Something both Liberals and Conservatives Can Love

May. 26, 2020—Brian T. Fitzpatrick | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1147 (2020) | In Professor Redish’s review of my new book, The Conservative Case for Class Actions, he argues that liberals should oppose the class action because the cy pres doctrine used to distribute settlement money is democratically illegitimate and that conservatives should oppose it because it...

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Plea Bargaining and Collateral Consequences: An Experimental Analysis

May. 26, 2020—Carlie Malone | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1161 (2020) | The overwhelming majority of convictions in the United States are obtained through guilty pleas. Many of these guilty pleas are a product of plea bargaining, where a defendant enters a guilty plea in exchange for some form of official concessions. Despite its prominence, plea bargaining...

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Generals & General Elections: Legal Responses to Partisan Endorsements by Retired Military Officers

May. 26, 2020—Hannah Martins Miller | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1209 (2020) | Retired generals and admirals of the U.S. military appear to be endorsing partisan political candidates in greater numbers, with more visibility. This Note argues that the practice represents a clear danger to civilian control over the military and weakens military effectiveness. It explains that while...

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Statistical Precedent: Allocating Judicial Attention

Apr. 20, 2020—Ryan W. Copus | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 605 | Suffering from a well-covered “crisis of volume,” the U.S. Courts of Appeals have patched together an ad hoc system of triage in an effort to provide cases with sufficient attention. For example, only some cases are assigned to central staff, analyzed by law clerks, orally...

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Reconstructing the Congressional Guarantee of Republican Government

Apr. 20, 2020—David S. Louk | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 673 | The Republican Guarantee Clause of Article IV, Section 4 promises that “[t]he United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government.” Although this clause might seem to confer significant power to oversee the political structures of the states, ambiguity...

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Litigating Citizenship

Apr. 20, 2020—Cassandra Burke Robertson & Irina D. Manta | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 757 | By what standard of proof—and by what procedures—can the U.S. government challenge citizenship status? That question has taken on greater urgency in recent years. News reports discuss cases of individuals whose passports were suddenly denied, even after the government had previously...

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Social Checks and Balances: A Private Fairness Doctrine

Apr. 20, 2020—Michael P. Vandenbergh | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 811 | This Essay proposes a private standards and certification system to induce media firms to provide more complete and accurate information. It argues that this new private governance system is a viable response to the channelized flow of information that is exacerbating political polarization in the...

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Reviving “Dead Letters”: Reimagining Federal Rule of Evidence 410 as a Conditional Privilege

Apr. 20, 2020—Peter G. Cornick | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 857 | Though understudied relative to its fellow specialized relevance rules, Federal Rule of Evidence 410 protects a crucial element of the criminal justice system: plea negotiations. As written, the rule prevents the admission of evidence gathered during plea discussions, which helps assure criminal defendants that their candid...

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Rejection Hurts: Trademark Licenses and the Bankruptcy Code

Apr. 20, 2020—Amanda E. James | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 889 | Section 365 of the Bankruptcy Code empowers debtors to reject burdensome executory contracts. From 1988 until May 2019, the effect of such a rejection on trademark licenses was unclear. The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Mission Product Holdings, Inc. v. Tempnology, LLC settled the matter...

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The Misuse of Tobin’s q

Mar. 25, 2020—Robert Bartlett & Frank Partnoy | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 353 (2020) | In recent years, scholars have addressed the most important topics in corporate law based on a flawed assumption: that the ratio of the market value of a corporation’s securities to their book value is a valid measure of the value of the...

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Broken Records: Reconceptualizing Rational Basis Review to Address “Alternative Facts” in the Legislative Process

Mar. 25, 2020—Joseph Landau | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 425 (2020) | In 2016, North Carolina passed “HB2,” also known as the “bathroom ban”—a law prohibiting transgender individuals from accessing public restrooms corresponding to their gender identity—based on the unfounded fear that cisgender men posing as transgender women would assault women and girls in bathrooms. Around the...

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Patenting New Uses for Old Inventions

Mar. 25, 2020—Sean B. Seymore | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 478 (2020) | A bedrock principle of patent law is that old inventions cannot be patented. And a new use for an old invention does not render the old invention patentable. This is because patent law requires novelty—an invention must be new. But while a new use...

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