Skip to main content

Articles

Law and Neighborhood Names

Apr. 30, 2019—Nestor M. Davidson & David Fagundes | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 757 (2019) | Law-and-Neighborhood-Names This Article provides a novel investigation of how law both enables and constrains the ability of city residents to claim, name, and often rename their neighborhoods. A rich interdisciplinary dialogue in fields such as geography and sociology has emerged on...

Read more


Presidential Factfinding

Apr. 30, 2019—Shalev Roisman | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 825 (2019) | Presidential-Factfinding The modern President possesses enormous power. She can use military force abroad without congressional authorization, impose economic sanctions on foreign powers, or enter into trade agreements with foreign states. She can do all this on her own, with little constraint. Or so it seems....

Read more


Incapacitating Criminal Corporations

Apr. 30, 2019—W. Robert Thomas | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 905 (2019) | Incapacitating-Criminal-Corporations If there is any consensus in the fractious debates over corporate punishment, it is this: a corporation cannot be imprisoned, incarcerated, jailed, or otherwise locked up. Whatever fiction the criminal law entertains about corporate personhood, having a physical “body to kick”—and, by extension,...

Read more


Irrational Ignorance at the Patent Office

Apr. 30, 2019—Michael D. Frakes & Melissa F. Wasserman | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 975 (2019) | Irrational-Ignorance-at-the-Patent-Office There is widespread belief that the Patent Office issues too many “bad” patents that impose significant harms on society. At first glance, the solution to the patent quality crisis seems straightforward: give patent examiners more time to review applications...

Read more


Online Appendix to Irrational Ignorance at the Patent Office

Apr. 27, 2019—Online-Appendix-to-Irrational-Ignorance-at-the-Patent-Office AUTHORS: Michael D. Frakes & Melissa F. Wasserman

Read more


Private Enforcement in Administrative Courts

Mar. 30, 2019—Private-Enforcement-in-Administrative-Courts Scholars debating the relative merits of public and private enforcement have long trained their attention on the federal courts. For some, laws giving private litigants rights to vindicate important policies generate unaccountable “private attorneys general” who interfere with public enforcement goals. For others, private lawsuits save cash-strapped government lawyers money, time, and resources by...

Read more


Licensing Knowledge

Mar. 30, 2019—Licensing-Knowledge When professionals give advice, they disseminate professional knowledge to their clients. Professional advice is valuable to clients because they gain access to a body of knowledge they do not otherwise possess. To preserve the accuracy, and hence the value, of this knowledge transfer, the First Amendment should protect professional speech against state interference that...

Read more


The Exclusionary Rule in the Age of Blue Data

Mar. 30, 2019—The-Exclusionary-Rule-in-the-Age-of-Blue-Data In Herring v. United States, Chief Justice John Roberts reframed the Supreme Court’s understanding of the exclusionary rule: “As laid out in our cases, the exclusionary rule serves to deter deliberate, reckless, or grossly negligent conduct, or in some circumstances recurring or systemic negligence.” The open question remains: How can defendants demonstrate sufficient recurring...

Read more


Repealing Patents

Mar. 30, 2019—Repealing-Patents The first known patent case in the United States courts did not enforce a patent. Instead, it sought to repeal one. The practice of cancelling granted patent rights has appeared in various forms over the past two-and–a-quarter centuries, from the earliest U.S. patent law in 1790 to the new regime of inter partes review...

Read more


Regulating Offshore Finance

Jan. 28, 2019—Regulating-Offshore-Finance From the Panama Papers to the Paradise Papers, massive document leaks in recent years have exposed trillions of dollars hidden in small offshore jurisdictions. Attracting foreign capital with low tax rates and environments of secrecy, a growing number of offshore jurisdictions have emerged as major financial havens hosting thousands of hedge funds, trusts, banks,...

Read more


Wealth-Based Penal Disenfranchisement

Jan. 28, 2019—Wealth-Based-Penal-Disenfranchisement This Article offers the first comprehensive examination of the way in which the inability to pay economic sanctions—fines, fees, surcharges, and restitution—may prevent people of limited means from voting. The Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of penal disenfranchisement upon conviction, and all but two states revoke the right to vote for at least...

Read more


Boilerplate and the Impact of Disclosure in Securities Dealmaking

Jan. 28, 2019—Boilerplate-and-the-Impact-of-Disclosure-in-Securities-Dealmaking Capital markets dealmaking, like many kinds of business transactions, is built on a foundation of copied and recycled language—what many call boilerplate. Regulators and the bar periodically call for less reliance on boilerplate, but despite these pressures, boilerplate remains a fixture of ever-growing securities disclosures. This Article explores why boilerplate persists and how it...

Read more


Introduction: Reflections on the Future of Discovery in Civil Cases

Nov. 30, 2018—Introduction-Reflections-on-the-Future-of-Discovery-in-Civil-Cases AUTHOR: Honorable Paul W. Grimm

Read more


How We Got Here: A Brief History of Requester-Pays and Other Incentive Systems to Supplement Judicial Management of Discovery

Nov. 30, 2018—How-We-Got-Here-A-Brief-History-of-Requester-Pays-and-Other-Incentive-Systems-to-Supplement-Judicial-Management-of-Discovery AUTHOR: E. Donald Elliott

Read more


Opting Out of Discovery

Nov. 30, 2018—Opting-Out-of-Discovery AUTHOR: Jay Tidmarsh

Read more


Discovery Cost Allocation, Due Process, and the Constitution’s Role in Civil Litigation

Nov. 30, 2018—Discovery-Cost-Allocation-Due-Process-and-the-Constitution’s-Role-in-Civil-Litigation AUTHOR: Martin H. Redish

Read more