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‘Sociology’

Department of Medicine, Health, and Society expands collaborative potential with new hires

Apr. 20, 2021—In 2007, Vanderbilt’s College of Arts and Science launched an innovative new major called Medicine, Health, and Society (MHS). From attracting just 40 enrollees in its first year, the interdisciplinary program has grown rapidly into one of A&S’s most popular majors. More than 700 undergraduate students are now studying toward an MHS degree, and MHS...

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College of Arts and Science faculty share recommendations for reading women authors

Mar. 25, 2021—Women’s History Month is both an opportunity and an invitation: an opportunity to learn more about an often-hidden side of history and culture, and an invitation to develop a new awareness, concerns, and habits of learning that can carry through the rest of the year. As part of the College of Arts and Science’s celebration...

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New research uncovers crucial role of activist lawyers in expanding women’s rights

Mar. 8, 2021—The history of women’s rights in the United States is inextricable from the history of social movements. In the nineteenth century, married women fought for legal personhood and the right to own property independent of their husbands. In the early 1900s, women mobilized for the right to vote. And beginning in the 1960s, “second-wave” feminists...

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Persistence in a pandemic: College of Arts and Science students work for social change through nonprofit organizations

Oct. 30, 2020—Though the COVID-19 pandemic scuttled many students’ original summer 2020 plans, College of Arts and Science students adapted quickly. Through technology, creativity, and determination, they found ways to expand their horizons and continue preparing for life after Vanderbilt. Students Rashmi Bharadwaj and Joe Miller both want to make an impact on society. This summer, they...

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Resources for Engaging With the Spirit of Juneteenth

Jun. 19, 2020—On June 19, 1865, Union Major General Gordon Granger declared to the state of Texas—the Confederacy’s western frontier—that “all slaves are free.” June 19, shortened to “Juneteenth,” quickly became an annual day of celebration for Texas’s black community. By the 1920s, it had spread around the country, and in 1979, the tradition came full-circle as...

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