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Spring 2022

JS 1002W 01: Introduction to Jewish Studies

Taught by David Price
TR 9:30-10:45AM

Introduction to Judaism and Jewish history through philosophical, political, social, psychological, and artistic perspectives. Biblical studies; culture, philosophy, and literature. Antiquity and the medieval world; modern and contemporary experience.

Repeat credit for students who have completed 1002

AXLE: 1000-level W course
AXLE: International Cultures
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 1010 01: Judaism: An Introduction

Taught by Rebecca Epstein-Levi and Phillip Ackerman-Lieberman
TR 1:15-2:30PM

Judaism from the ancient Near East to the present day. The Jewish life cycle. Varieties of Jewish practice throughout history. Interaction and dialogue with other religious communities, and the challenges posed by modernity in the wake of Jewish ‘enlightenment’ and political emancipation.

AXLE: International Cultures
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 1111 01: First-Year Writing Seminar – FYS: Cold War Struggle

Taught by Saul Kelner
MWF 10:10-11:00AM

From the 1950s to 1990s, a worldwide human rights campaign fought state-sponsored antisemitism in the USSR, facilitating the exodus of 1.5 million people. What was the nature of Soviet antisemitism? How did activists organize in the US, Israel and USSR? What strategies and tactics enabled activists to successfully pressure a totalitarian superpower to change policy? Civic engagement, religious politics, post-Holocaust Judaism, and Cold War culture.

Independent learning and inquiry in an environment in which students can express knowledge and defend opinions through intensive class discussion, oral presentations, and written expression.

May be repeated for credit once if there is no duplication of topic, but students may earn only up to 3 credits in any 1111 course per semester of enrollment.

AXLE: First-Year Writing Seminar

JS 2150 01: Issues in Rabbinic Literature

Taught by Rebecca Epstein-Levi and Phillip Ackerman-Lieberman
TR 9:30-10:45AM

History of Rabbinic thought from its origins to the Middle Ages through the reading of central Rabbinic texts. Capital punishment, women in Rabbinic culture, sectarianism, and the power structures of Roman Palestine and Sasanian Babylonia.

May be repeated for credit more than once if there is no duplication in topic, but students may earn only up to 6 credits per semester of enrollment.

Cross-listed with JS 5150 01
Cross-listed with DIV 5150 01
AXLE: International Cultures
Eligible for Law, History, and Society
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 2230W 01: American Southern Jews in Life and Literature

Taught by Adam Meyer
MWF 11:15AM-12:05PM

From colonial times to the present. Interactions between Southern Jews and other Southerners, and between Southern and Northern Jews. The Civil War, Jewish economic activities, and the civil rights movement.

AXLE: 2000-level and above W course
AXLE: History and Culture of the United States
Eligible for English

JS 2240W 01: Black-Jewish Relations in Post-War American Literature and Culture

Taught by Adam Meyer
MWF 9:05-9:55AM

The historical relationship between African Americans and Jewish Americans and its portrayal in novels, short stories, and films by artists from both communities.

AXLE: 2000-level and above W course
AXLE: History and Culture of the United States
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 2255 01: Creative Writing with Jewish Perspectives

Taught by Judith Klass
MWF 2:30-3:20PM

Creative writing course with readings as broad how-to guides. How Jewish and non-Jewish writers engage with or distance themselves from their their socio-ethnic/religious identity. Reading and writing in multiple genres including short stories, autobiography, poetry, plays, screenplays, and song lyrics. Exploration of different styles and techniques of writing, such as narrative voice and dialogue.

AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts

JS 2270W 01: Jewish Storytelling

Taught by Allison Schachter
TR 1:15-2:30PM

Twentieth-century short fiction and narrative traditions. The transition from religious to secular cultural forms. Immigration and ethnic literary forms. All works are in English or English translation from Yiddish, Hebrew, and Russian.

Repeat credit for students who have completed 2270

AXLE: 2000-level and above W course
AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts
Eligible for English
Eligible for European Studies
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 2420W 01: American Jewish Songwriters

Taught by Judith Klass
MWF 1:25-2:15PM

From the late 19th Century to the present. Vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley, the development of the stage musical, and the Brill Building. Folk, rock, pop, and country. Contributions of Jewish songwriters to American music.

AXLE: 2000-level and above W course
AXLE: History and Culture of the United States
Eligible for American Studies
Eligible for Religious Studies

JS 2530W 01: Modern Israeli Culture

Taught by Mazalit Haim
MW 2:30-3:45PM

Social and cultural history of modern Israel from the establishment of the State in 1948 to the present. Representations of national identity, collective belonging, and historical memory in public culture.

Cross-listed with CMA 2530W 01
AXLE: 2000-level and above W course
AXLE: International Cultures

JS 2640W 01: Jews and Greeks

Taught by David Wasserstein
MWF 10:10-11:00AM

From the seventh century BCE to ca. 1500 CE. Sites of interaction, languages, cultural ties, religious tensions, political conflicts, and competing philosophies. Works by Elephantine, Alexander the Great, the Maccabees, the Septuagint, Aristeas, Josephus, Philo, the rabbis, the New Testament, Ezekiel the Tragedian, Byzantium.

Serves as repeat credit for students who have earned credit for 2640.

Cross-listed with CLAS 3250W 01

ENGL 3664 01: Jewish American Literature

Taught by Allison Schachter
TR 11:00AM-12:15PM

This course surveys the development of American Jewish writing from the end of the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. The first of part of the class looks at novels and short stories that represent the challenges faced by Jewish immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In the second-half of the semester we will read post-World War II writing by diverse Jewish writers, many of whom have been assimilated into the American literary canon, such as Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, and Grace Paley. We will pay close attention to questions of immigration, gender, race, and ethnic identity. To what extent should we read these authors as Jewish writers and to what extent are they American? How do Jewish writers in America straddle the divide between Jewish culture and modern American life? How have they defined experience in modern American life?

AXLE: Humanities and the Creative Arts
Eligible for American Studies
Eligible for English